Ideology and moral values in rhetorical framing: How wine was saved from the 19th Century Phylloxera Epidemic

Winston Kwon, Panos Constantinides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Extant organizational research into crises has focused on the efforts of different actors to defend and legitimate their ideologies towards particular actions. Although insightful, such research has offered little knowledge about the moral reasoning underlying such action. In this paper, we explore how moral reasoning from different ideological viewpoints can lead to polarised debates and stalemate within the context of ecological crises. We apply our conceptual framework in an analysis of the 19th Century French Phylloxera Epidemic (hereafter the Phylloxera Epidemic). Drawing upon this analysis, we argue that, by adapting their moral reasoning, opposing stakeholder groups could maintain their underlying ideology, while at the same time pragmatically changing their actions towards the crisis. We discuss the theoretical implications of our analysis for historical research in organizational studies and research on organizations and the natural environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1031-1053
JournalOrganization Studies
Volume39
Issue number8
Early online date21 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • ideology
  • moral reasoning
  • ecological crises
  • phylloxera epidemic
  • wine

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