Illusory attitudes and the playful stoic

Michael Ridge*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

What we might usefully call “playing full-stop” and playing games plausibly figure in a well-lived life. Yet there are reasons to worry that the two not only do not naturally go hand in hand, but are in fact deeply opposed. In this essay I investigate the apparent tension between playing full-stop and playing competitive games. I argue that the nature of this tension is easily exaggerated. While there is a psychological tension between simultaneously engaging in earnest competitive game play and playing fullstop, there is no logical contradiction between the two. Somewhat surprisingly, seeing how this tension is best understood teaches us something about the nature of willing an end and the “guise of the good.” With a resolution of the apparent tension between playing full-stop and playing competitive games, I turn to the practical worry that playing competitive games is destructive precisely for the very reasons it is opposed to playing full-stop. Here I develop a positive proposal to mitigate the tension between playing full-stop and playing competitive games. This proposal draws on the idea of “striving play” as recently developed by Thi Nguyen and some ideas from classical Stoicism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhilosophical Studies
Early online date9 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Jan 2021

Keywords

  • action theory
  • competition
  • games
  • guise of the good
  • play
  • value theory

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Illusory attitudes and the playful stoic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this