Immunohistochemical differentiation of reactive from malignant mesothelium as a diagnostic aid in canine pericardial disease

Elspeth Milne, Yolanda Martinez-Pereira, Clare Muir, Tim Scase, Darren Shaw, Gillian McGregor, Lucy Oldroyd, Emma Scurrell, Mike Martin, Craig Devine, Hannah Hodgkiss-Geere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To develop a provisional immunohistochemistry panel for distinguishing reactive pericardium, atypical mesothelial proliferation and mesothelioma in dogs.
Methods: Haematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin, vimentin, insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3, glucose transporter 1, and desmin were carried out on archived pericardial biopsies, and scored for intensity and number of cells stained.
Results: From haematoxylin and eosin staining, 10 reactive mesothelium (group R), 17 of atypical mesothelial proliferation (group A), 26 of mesothelioma (group M) and 5 of normal pericardium (group C) were obtained. Cytokeratin and vimentin were expressed in all, confirming mesothelial origin. Group C had the lowest scores for insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3, glucose transporter 1 and desmin. Of the disease groups, M and A were similar to each other with higher scores for insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 and glucose transporter 1 than group R. Desmin staining was variable. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 was best to distinguish between disease groups, with increasing scores from R to A to M, with group R indistinguishable from group C. In a few mesotheliomas, glucose transporter 1 conferred an advantage over insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3.
Clinical significance: An immunohistochemistry panel of cytokeratin, vimentin, insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 and glucose transporter 1 could provide useful additional information over haematoxylin and eosin staining alone in the diagnosis of cases of mesothelial proliferations in canine pericardium although further validation is warranted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-271
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Volume59
Issue number5
Early online date2 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Keywords

  • Mesothelioma
  • Idiopathic pericarditis
  • GLUT1
  • IMP3
  • Canine

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