IMPACT OF A FOCUSSED TEACHING PROGRAMME ON PRACTICAL PRESCRIBING SKILLS AMONG FINAL YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

E. A. Sandilands, K. Reid, L. Shaw, N. Dhaun, D. N. Bateman, D. J. Webb, D. C. Kluth

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Introduction: Errors in prescribing are frequently made by junior doctors.
We conducted a prospective, case-controlled study among final year
medical students to assess prescribing standards and the impact of a prescribing teaching programme.
Methods: Final year medical students undertaking an 8-week general
medicine module randomly assigned to two teaching hospitals participated.
The intervention group underwent a prescribing assessment in week
1, followed by a focussed doctor- and pharmacist-led teaching programme
in prescribing. A second different prescribing assessment was completed
in week 8. Prescribing confidence was assessed using a scale of 1 (no confidence) to 5 (very confident). A control group attending another hospital
completed the same assessments but received no additional teaching.
Results: A significant improvement in overall score, allergy documentation
and prescribing confidence was observed in the intervention group
with a reduction in the number of errors per prescription (Table 1).
Conclusion: Final year medical students make significant errors in prescribing.
However, focussed teaching can improve prescribing ability and confidence. Further research will ascertain whether this translates into safer prescribing by junior doctors.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberWP2
Pages (from-to)75-75
JournalBasic and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Volume105
Issue numberSupplement 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

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