Improving the physical appearance and social perceptions of woodlands in deprived communities: Experiences of parents and care-givers of children

Sara Tilley, Eva Silveirinha de Oliveira, Catharine Ward Thompson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that green spaces may influence, positively, psychological wellbeing; promote physical activity and social interaction. However, many groups of people fail to visit these types of environment including women with young children. This paper presents findings from a survey that was undertaken in six deprived communities across Scotland in 2013 (n=2117) before physical design and social interventions were made to local woodlands. We focus on these baseline findings which include frequency of visits to the woodlands by parents with children (n=569) living within 1.5km of the boundaries of their local woodlands. We also consider their perceptions of the woodlands, particularly in terms of accessibility and safety, as well as examine gender differences. Finally, we present the results of their self-reported mental well-being (Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale). Preliminary findings show that visits to the woodlands was low amongst parents. Among those with parental responsibilities, men were more likely to visit woodlands than women (p<0,05). These findings are important to set up the baseline framework as it will help to monitor what type of interventions can change perceptions and enhance access to woodlands amongst parents and care-givers of children thus potentially lead to increases in wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 2015
Event4th International City Health Conference - Barcelona, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Nov 20156 Nov 2015

Conference

Conference4th International City Health Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBarcelona
Period5/11/156/11/15

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