Increased susceptibility of transgenic mice expressing human PrP to experimental sheep BSE is not due to increased agent titre in sheep brain tissue

Christopher Plinston, Patricia Hart, Nora Hunter, Jean C Manson, Rona M Barron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and variant Creutzfeldt Jacob disease (vCJD) in humans have previously been shown to be caused by the same strain of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agent. It is hypothesised that the agent spread to humans following consumption of food products prepared from infected cattle. Despite evidence supporting zoonotic transmission, mouse models expressing human prion protein (HuTg) have consistently shown poor transmission rates when inoculated with cattle BSE. Higher rates of transmission have however been observed when these mice are exposed to BSE which has been experimentally transmitted through sheep or goats, indicating that humans may potentially be more susceptible to BSE from small ruminants. Here we demonstrate that increased transmissibility of small ruminant BSE to HuTg mice was not due to replication of higher levels of infectivity in sheep brain tissue, and is instead due to other specific changes in the infectious agent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1855-1859
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume95
Issue number8
Early online date14 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2014

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