Individual differences in proof structures following multimodal logic teaching

Jon Oberlander, Richard Cox, Padraic Monaghan, Keith Stenning, Richard Tobin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We have been studying how students respond to multimodal logic teaching with Hyperproof. Performance measures have already indicated that students’ pre-existing cognitive styles have a significant impact on teaching outcome. Furthermore, a substantial corpus of proofs has been gathered via automatic logging of proof development. We report results from analyses of final proof structure, exploiting (i) ‘proofograms’, a novel method of proof visualisation, and (ii) corpus-linguistic bigram analysis of rule use. Results suggest that students’ cognitive styles do indeed influence the structure of their logical discourse, and that the effect may be attributable to the relative skill with which students manipulate graphical abstractions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 18th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
EditorsGarrison W. Cottrell
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates
Pages201-206
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)0-8058-2541-X
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventEighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society - University of California, La Jolla, CA, United States
Duration: 12 Jul 199615 Jul 1996

Conference

ConferenceEighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
CountryUnited States
CityLa Jolla, CA
Period12/07/9615/07/96

Keywords

  • individual difference
  • brand new way
  • corpus-linguistic bigram analysis
  • substantial corpus graphical abstraction
  • automatic logging
  • rule use
  • final proof structure
  • significant impact
  • pre-existing cognitive style
  • logical discourse
  • cognitive style
  • novel method
  • proof development
  • relative skill
  • proof visualisation
  • performance measure

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