Individual differences in prophetic dream belief and experience: Exploring demographic and sleep-related correlates

Milan Valasek, Caroline Watt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A large proportion of the general population believes that dreams can provide information about future events that could not have been obtained by any known means. The present study identifies several factors associated with prophetic (precognitive) dream belief and experience. Participants (N = 672) were measured on demo- graphic variables, sleep characteristics, and precognitive dream (PD) belief, experience, and frequency. Three ‘sleep clusters’ were identified based on the analysis of the sleep-related variables. Women were more likely to believe in PDs as well as experience them. There was a positive relationship of PD belief and experience with age and a negative one with education. Most notably, we found that a high frequency of PD experiences was associated with erratic sleep patterns and sleep medication use. The present study provides a basis for the devel- opment of further models explaining the prevalent phenomena of precognitive dream belief and experience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-69
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume87
Early online date30 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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