Intelligence, practice and virtue: A critical review of the educational benefits of expertise in physical education and sport

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Abstract

The paper calls for a re-evaluation of physical education’s cognitive value claims, as this issue is fundamental to many of the conceptual difficulties the subject faces. Current epistemological challenges are reviewed before analyzing the structural connections between intelligent practice and intelligent virtues, and the possibilities for physical education to better articulate its’ intrinsic and instrumental values claims. The paper evaluates arguments made on this basis and reviews revised curriculum planning and pedagogical practices which could support an enhanced focus on learners’ wider aspirations and achievements; factors crucial for a virtuous life. While applauding enquiry into the possibilities for considering physical education as a moral endevour, the paper raises concerns about conceptual clarity in intellectual and empirical accounts of virtue. The paper concludes by advocating further research on the interrelationship between intellectual and empirical accounts of skill, evaluation of learners’ decision making and the aims of physical education and school sport programmes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
JournalSport, Ethics and Philosophy
Early online date5 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • intellectual virtues
  • moral virtues
  • practical wisdom
  • skills
  • expertise

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