Investigation and management of serum sodium after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SaSH): a survey of practice in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland

Steven Tominey, Kirun Baweja, Julie Woodfield, Thomas J G Chambers, Michael T C Poon, Anthony N Wiggins, Paul M Brennan, James J M Loan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hyponatraemia is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We aimed to determine current neurosurgical practice for the identification, investigation and management of hyponatraemia after SAH.

METHODS: An online questionnaire was completed by UK and Irish neurosurgical trainees and consultant collaborators in the Sodium after Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SaSH) audit.

RESULTS: Between August 2019 and June 2020, 43 responses were received from 31 of 32 UK and Ireland adult neurosurgical units (NSUs). All units reported routine measurement of serum sodium either daily or every other day. Most NSUs reported routine investigation of hyponatraemia after SAH with paired serum and urinary osmolalities (94%), urinary sodium (84%), daily fluid balance (84%), but few measured glucose (19%), morning cortisol (13%), or performed a short Synacthen test (3%). Management of hyponatraemia was variable, with units reporting use of oral sodium supplementation (77%), fluid restriction (58%), hypertonic saline (55%), and fludrocortisone (19%).

CONCLUSIONS: Reported assessment of serum sodium after SAH was consistent between units, whereas management of hyponatraemia varied. This may reflect the lack of a specific evidence-base to inform practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Neurosurgery
Early online date20 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Jan 2021

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