Investigation of hypomagnesaemia prevalence and underlying aetiology in a hospitalised cohort of dogs with ionised hypocalcaemia

Glynn A Woods, Ioannis L Oikonomidis, Adam G Gow, Camilla Tørnqvist-Johnsen, Pierre Boyé, Yuru Chng, Richard J Mellanby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

OBJECTIVES: Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and plays a critical role in a wide range of physiological processes. Low concentrations of ionised calcium, the most metabolically available form of calcium, have been linked to an increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes in dogs. Magnesium plays an important role in parathyroid hormone function. The objective of this study was to define the prevalence and aetiology of hypomagnesaemia in a hospitalised cohort of dogs with ionised hypocalcaemia (IHC).

METHODS: A total magnesium reference interval was established using serum biochemistry results from 346 clinically healthy dogs. The clinical records of dogs with IHC were reviewed, and concurrent serum magnesium concentrations were recorded alongside clinical signs and underlying aetiology. The prevalence, clinical presentation and aetiology of hypomagnesaemia were examined in the IHC population.

RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-five IHC dogs were identified. Hypomagnesaemia was identified in 22%. Total magnesium concentration was significantly higher in dogs with renal disease. The most common cause of concurrent hypomagnesaemia and IHC was gastrointestinal diseases.

CONCLUSION: Low concentrations of serum magnesium occur in approximately one fifth of all dogs with IHC. Further studies are required to clarify the link between magnesium status, IHC and clinical outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere301
JournalThe Veterinary record
Early online date19 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Apr 2021

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