"Invisible burials" and fragmentation practices in Iron Age Europe: Excavations at the Monte Bernorio Necropolis (Northern Spain)

Jesús F. Torres-Martínez, Manuel Fernandez-Gotz, Santiago Domínguez-Solera, Antxoka Martínez-Velasco, David Vacas Madrid, Mariano Serna-Gancedo, Gadea Cabanillas de la Torre, Marcos Galeano, Ricardo Fernandes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The scarcity of burial remains in large parts of Iron Age Europe, particularly in the Atlantic regions, has often led scholars to discuss the apparent ‘invisibility’ of graves. This paper presents the results from several excavation campaigns at Monte Bernorio, one of the most important sites of the first millennium BC on the Iberian Peninsula. The fieldwork and post-excavation work carried out in the area of the necropolis have identified numerous burial pits, with complex ritual activities characterized by fragmentation and the practice of the pars pro toto. In addition, evidence for later rituals in some of the graves can be linked to ancestor worship. The results provide important insights into funerary practices in Late Iron Age Europe, leading us to rethink the very meaning of cemeteries in the study area and beyond.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Field Archaeology
Early online date27 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 May 2021

Keywords

  • archaeology of death
  • Atlantic Europe
  • Iron Age
  • Monte Bernorio
  • fragmentation
  • 1st millennium B.C.
  • oppidum

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '"Invisible burials" and fragmentation practices in Iron Age Europe: Excavations at the Monte Bernorio Necropolis (Northern Spain)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this