Is particulate air pollution associated with health and health inequalities in New Zealand?

Elizabeth A. Richardson, Jamie Pearce, Simon Kingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Air pollution can increase mortality risk and may also exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities in health outcomes. This New Zealand study investigated whether exposure to particulate air pollution (PM10) was associated with mortality and health inequalities. Annual mean PM10 estimates for urban Census Area Units (CAUs) were linked to cause-specific mortality data. A dose-response relationship was found between PM10 and respiratory disease mortality, including at concentrations below the existing annual average guideline value of 20 mu g m(-3). Establishing and enforcing a lower guideline value is likely to have population health benefits. However, socioeconomic inequalities in respiratory disease mortality were not significantly elevated with PM10 exposure. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1137-1143
Number of pages7
JournalHealth & Place
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2011

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Air pollution
  • New Zealand
  • Mortality
  • Respiratory disease
  • Health inequalities
  • CAUSE-SPECIFIC MORTALITY
  • ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ANALYSIS
  • AMERICAN-CANCER-SOCIETY
  • LONG-TERM EXPOSURE
  • TIME-SERIES
  • EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
  • SCHOOL-CHILDREN
  • ELDERLY-PEOPLE
  • CHRISTCHURCH
  • POLLUTANTS

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