Is the racial composition of your surroundings associated with your levels of social dominance orientation?

Helena R. M. Radke*, Matthew J. Hornsey, Chris G. Sibley, Michael Thai, Fiona Kate Barlow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigate the extent to which minority group members are surrounded by outgroup members in their immediate environment as a predictor of social dominance orientation. Using a large representative sample of New Zealanders, we found that minority group members in outgroup dense environments reported lower levels of social dominance orientation (Study 1). In studies 2 and 3, Asian Australian and Black American participants who were surrounded by outgroup members reported lower social dominance orientation. For majority group (White) participants there was no association between social dominance orientation and outgroup density. Study 4 explained the overall pattern: Black Americans surrounded by outgroup members perceived their group to be of lower status in their immediate environment, and through this, reported lower social dominance orientation. This article adds to growing literature on contextual factors that predict social dominance orientation, especially among minority group members.
Original languageEnglish
Article number0186612
Number of pages16
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Oct 2017

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