Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study

Léopold Fezeu, G. David Batty, Catharine Gale, Mika Kivimaki, Serge Hercberg, Sebastien Czernichow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The direction of the association between mental health and adiposity is poorly understood. Our objective was to empirically examine this link in a UK study. This is a prospective cohort study of 3 388 people (men) aged  18 years at study induction who participated in both the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey at baseline (HALS-1, 1984/1985) and the re-survey (HALS-2, 1991/1992). At both survey examinations, body mass index, waist circumference and self-reported common mental disorder (the 30-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ) were measured. Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between (1) baseline common mental disorder (QHQ score > 4) and subsequent general and abdominal obesity and (2) baseline general and abdominal obesity and re-survey common mental disorders. After controlling for a range of covariates, participants with common mental disorder at baseline experienced greater odds of subsequently becoming overweight (women, OR: 1.30, 1.03 – 1.64; men, 1.05, 0.81 – 1.38) and obese (women, 1.26, 0.82 – 1.94; men, OR: 2.10, 1.23 – 3.55) than those who were free of common mental disorder. Similarly, having baseline common mental health disorder was also related to a greater risk of developing moderate (1.57, 1.21 – 2.04) and severe (1.48, 1.09 – 2.01) abdominal obesity (women only). Baseline general or abdominal obesity was not associated with the risk of future common mental disorder. These findings of the present study suggest that the direction of association between common mental disorders and adiposity is from common mental disorder to increased future risk of adiposity as opposed to the converse.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0119970
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2015

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this