"It smells like a thousand angels marching": The salvific sensorium in Rio de Janeiro's western subúrbios

Laurie Denyer Willis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Based on almost three years of ethnographic research living in Rio de Janeiro’s subúrbios, I consider how the senses comes to matter and how Pentecostalism, margins, smells, and soaps are put to work to construct new kinds of affective space. To do so, I track the way in which a fragrance composed of runoff waste from an international flavor and fragrance company has come to be understood as “pieces of grace,” or divinely given fragments of prosperity. I argue that the forms of racial and spatial governance that enable something like repurposed waste to become pieces of grace form part of a larger story of the sensorium of the subúrbios. In contending with Rio’s racialized urban landscape and how it is sensed and made sense of, I look to what I call the salvific sensorium, a kind of sensed space and territory that exists by engaging the senses with a divine alterity that reconfigures worth and temporality. It is affectively generative, if fleetingly so, and capacious enough to be open to both optimism and its cruelties.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-349
Number of pages25
JournalCultural Anthropology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Keywords

  • senses
  • affect
  • race
  • value
  • Pentecostalism
  • Brazil

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