It's a Long Way to Auchterarder! ‘Negotiated Management’ and Mismanagement in the Policing of G8 Protests

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Abstract

Recent analyses of protest policing in Western democracies argue that there has been a marked shift away from oppressive or coercive approaches to an emphasis on consensus based negotiation. King and Waddington (2005) amongst others, however, suggest that the policing of international summits may be an exception to this rule. This paper examines protest policing in relation to the 2005 G8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland. We argue that ‘negotiated management’ cannot be imported wholesale as a policing strategy. Rather it is mediated by local history, forms of police knowledge and modes of engagement. Drawing on interviews and participant observation we show that ‘negotiated management’ works best when both sides are committed to negotiation and that police stereotyping or protestor intransigence can lead to the escalation of any given event. In closing we note the new challenges posed by forms of ‘global’ protest and consider the implications for future policing of protest.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-205
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • Policing
  • protest
  • negotiated management
  • G8
  • flashpoints model

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