'It's different, but it's the same': Perspectives of young adults with siblings with intellectual disabilities in residential care: Views of young adults with siblings in care

Paula Jacobs, Kenneth Macmahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Siblings often play significant roles in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. This study aims to give voice to young adults whose siblings have an intellectual disability and are in residential care.

Materials and Methods: Six participants were interviewed, with Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis methodology employed.

Results: Emergent themes included family and sibling relationships and concerns for the future. However, ambivalence, in terms of conflicting feelings within participants themselves, was striking. Dissonances within narratives included identifying as ‘one family’ whilst living apart, experiencing guilt while being supportive of the residential placement, and emphasising the normality of the sibling experience whilst also feeling different and isolated.

Conclusion: These findings reflect the particular complexity of sibling relationships when the person with an intellectual disability lives in residential care. There is a need to understand more about the perspectives of siblings, and the influence that residential care may have upon these.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Learning Disabilities
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • family support
  • residential services
  • intellectual disability
  • profound and severe learning disabilities

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''It's different, but it's the same': Perspectives of young adults with siblings with intellectual disabilities in residential care: Views of young adults with siblings in care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this