Lack of association between polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting-enzyme and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genes and normal cognitive ageing in humans

P M Visscher, M Tynan, M C Whiteman, A Pattie, I White, Caroline Hayward, A F Wright, John Starr, L J Whalley, I J Deary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The hypothesis that polymorphisms at two candidate genes that code for angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) are associated with normal cognitive ageing was tested using a sample (n = 536) of healthy 80-year-old people who were born in 1921 and whose cognitive ability at age I I was measured in the Scottish Mental Survey 1932. Cognitive ability at age I I and age 80 was assessed using the Moray House Test. Cognitive ageing was defined as the change in IQ from age I I to 80. There was no significant association between the tested ACE and MTHFR polymorphisms and IQ score at age 11, IQ at age 80, and IQ change (all P > 0.05). The ACE genotypes deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium proportions (P = 0.02), which could indicate that this gene is under selection. Polymorphisms at the two studied genes are unlikely to be risk factors for normal cognitive ageing. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-178
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume347
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Aug 2003

Keywords

  • angiotensin-converting-enzyme
  • methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
  • polymorphism
  • cognitive ageing
  • IQ
  • intelligence
  • Scottish Mental Survey
  • ACE GENE
  • OLD-AGE
  • PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE
  • I/D POLYMORPHISM
  • APOLIPOPROTEIN-E
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • DISEASE
  • SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • PERFORMANCE
  • IMPAIRMENT

Cite this