Language and tourism in Sabah, Malaysia and Edinburgh, Scotland

Alan A. Lew, Lauren Hall-Lew, Amie Fairs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

One of the newest areas of study in applied linguistics is within the tourism industry. Despite the centrality of language to tours (Cohen 1982, 1985; Coupland et al. 2005), tourism commodities (Pietikäinen & Kelly-Holmes 2001, Heller 2010), and place promotion (Coupland et al. 2005; Heller 2003), insights from linguistics have not had great impact on tourism research, practice, or policy (see Hall-Lew & Lew, 2014). This study presents a comparative analysis of language attitudes in two very different tourism contexts: Sabah, Malaysia and Edinburgh, Scotland. Both sites feature a thriving tourism industry, attracting large numbers of domestic and international visitors annually. The question for both locations is to what extent spoken linguistic variation might be considered a ‘heritage commodity’ (MacCannell 1999[1976]).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOpening New Lines of Communication in Applied Linguistics
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics
EditorsBernadette O’Rourke, Nicola Bermingham, Sara Brennan
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherScitsiugnil Press
Pages253
Number of pages259
ISBN (Print)978-0-9559533-6-1
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventOpening New Lines of Communication in Applied Linguistics: Proceedings of the 46th BAAL Annual Meeting - Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Sep 20137 Sep 2013

Conference

ConferenceOpening New Lines of Communication in Applied Linguistics: Proceedings of the 46th BAAL Annual Meeting
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period5/09/137/09/13

Keywords

  • language
  • linguistics
  • tourism
  • SCOTLAND

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