Language legislation and policy in the UK and Ireland: Different aspects of territoriality in a ‘Celtic’ context

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Abstract / Description of output

In spite of the long-term dominance in Britain and Ireland of English, other indige- nous languages continue to be spoken, and in relatively recent years several of those languages have benefited not only from a more coherent and supportive language policy but also from significant language legislation. One of the interesting features of these other indigenous languages is that, although strongly associated with rural ‘heartlands’ in the particular jurisdictions with which they are associated, they are also spoken in other parts of those jurisdictions, and, indeed, in other parts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. In this article, the ways in which the concept of territoriality has impacted upon legislation and on broader policy for two of these languages, Irish and Scottish Gaelic, will be considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-484
JournalInternational Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Nov 2016

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