Liability for the violation of Human Rights and labour standards in Global Supply Chains: A Common Law perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Where there have been violations of labour standards or human rights by organisations operating overseas, but such entities are either owned or controlled by a transnational corporation (‘TNC’) based in a Common Law system such as England and Wales, the current position in company, tort, contract and private international law is that the right of injured overseas workers (of those overseas entities) or citizens to recover the losses they have suffered from TNC is negligible to zero. This is startling in light of policies underpinning product liability and private laws. The question is whether modifications of existing private and company law doctrines could facilitate a change in the position whereby transnational corporations are held liable. Other possibilities for addressing the TNC accountability gap are also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-129
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of European Tort Law
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 2019

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Labour Law
  • Employment Law
  • Labour Standards
  • Human rights
  • human rights law
  • Tort Law
  • delict tort
  • Contract Law
  • Common Law
  • supply chain
  • corporate groups

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