Long-term cilostazol treatment reduces gliovascular damage and memory impairment in a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

Akihiro Kitamura, Yasmina Manso Sanz, Jessica Duncombe, James Searcy, Juraj Koudelka, Margareth Binnie, Scott Webster , Ross J Lennen, Maurits Jansen, Masafumi Ihara, Raj N. Kalaria, Karen Horsburgh (Lead Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a major cause of age-related vascular cognitive impairment. A well-characterised mouse model has shown that hypoperfusion results in gliovascular and white matter damage and impaired spatial working memory. In this study, we assessed whether cilostazol, a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, could protect against these changes. Adult, male C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery stenosis or a sham operation and fed normal or cilostazol diet for three months. Cilostazol treatment reduced the impairment in working memory and white matter function after hypoperfusion. Endothelial adhesion molecules and gliosis, increased after hypoperfusion, were ameliorated with cilostazol treatment. Interestingly, the improvement in working memory was closely correlated with reduced microglia and endothelial adhesion molecules. Further, the number of stroke lesions after hypoperfusion was reduced in the cilostazol-treated group. Altogether cilostazol showed potential to ameliorate the gliovascular damage and working memory impairments after hypoperfusion possibly via endothelial protection supporting its potential use in the treatment of vascular cognitive impairment.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScientific Reports
Early online date27 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Jun 2017

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