Long-term outcome following management of canine humeral intracondylar fissure using a medial approach and a cannulated drill system

Jessica McCarthy, Samantha Woods, John R Mosley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This study evaluated the feasibility, complications and long-term outcomes of using a cannulated drill system combined with intraoperative imaging to place a transcondylar screw for the management of canine humeral intracondylar fissure. Thirteen dogs were enrolled, with one dog undergoing staged bilateral surgery. No intraoperative complications occurred. Five minor (36%) and three major (21%) postoperative complications occurred, giving an overall complication rate of 57%. None of the screws placed penetrated the articular surface. The mean duration of surgery was 28 min (SD ±3.5) for dogs that developed a major complication versus 46 min (SD ±18.1) for those that did not (p=0.015). The duration of preoperative lameness was significantly shorter for cases which suffered a major complication (2 days; SD ±2.8) than those that did not (34 days; SD ±31.7, p=0.008). None of the variables assessed were significantly associated with minor complications. Median time from surgery to last follow-up was 5.8 years (range 3.5-8.5 years). Median Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs questionnaire score at the final point of follow-up was 16 (range 7-27). A significant number of patients were found to require analgesia at long-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
JournalVeterinary Record
Early online date14 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Aug 2019

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