'Look to yourselves, that we lose not those things which we have wrought': What do the proposed changes to the purpose limitation principle mean for public bodies’ rights to access third party data?

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Abstract

This article analyses the proposed changes to the purpose limitation principles contained in the draft Data Protection Regulation adopted by the European Commission in January 2012. It examines the historical motives for the introduction of the principle as part of the 1995 Data Protection Directive, and looks at the constitutional framework under which it operates both at EU and member state level. It considers the risks and long-term consequences that EU citizens may face if the principle is eroded or substantially abandoned.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-158
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Review of Law, Computers and Technology
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online date1 Jul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2014

Keywords

  • data protection
  • purpose limitation
  • privacy
  • surveillance
  • informational self-determination

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