MacIntyre's revolutionary Aristotelian philosophy and his idea of an educated public revisited

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Abstract

In this article I revisit MacIntyre's lecture on the idea of an educated public. I argue that the full significance of MacIntyre's views on the underlying purposes of universities only become clear when his lecture on the educated public is situated in the context of his wider ‘revolutionary Aristotelian’ philosophical project. I claim that for MacIntyre educational institutions should both support students to learn how to think for themselves and act for the common good. After considering criticisms from Putnam, Wain and Harris I conclude that MacIntyre's later work points towards an idea of educated ‘community’ that is more outward looking and open to difference than his earlier articulated idea of an educated ‘public’.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Philosophy of Education
Early online date22 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Nov 2016

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