Making London porcelain—A multidisciplinary project connecting local communities with the technological and innovation histories of London’s early porcelain manufacturers

Lucia Burgio*, Kelly Domoney, Georgia Haseldine, Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

This collaborative multidisciplinary pilot project involving the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), the Ashmolean Museum, and Newham Borough of London, examined the composition of a selection of eighteenth-century porcelain objects by two of London’s first porcelain manufacturers, Bow and Chelsea. As the first science-based public engagement project to be piloted by the V&A, it succeeded in bringing together young Londoners and their communities to investigate local histories of scientific and artistic innovation through the analysis and remaking of eighteenth-century porcelain. Scientific object analysis informed activities with local sixth-form students, revealing the intimate link between art and science, and showcasing the V&A Science Lab as a national hub for heritage science. Public outreach activities, including an exhibition at Stratford Library and workshops for Newham Heritage Month also provided hands-on learning, including curatorial and object-handling experience, and the embodied practices of remaking. Ultimately, this project stimulated new ways of engaging with ceramics collections and explored how the creativity and ingenuity of eighteenth-century ceramics pioneers can provide inspiration for the next generation of makers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1958-1976
Number of pages19
JournalHeritage
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2023

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Bow
  • ceramic heritage
  • Chelsea
  • English porcelain
  • public engagement
  • scientific analysis

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