Making the Auroras glow: regulation of Aurora A and B kinase function by interacting proteins

M. Carmena, S. Ruchaud, W.C. Earnshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The conserved Aurora family of protein kinases have emerged as crucial regulators of mitosis and cytokinesis. Despite their high degree of homology, Aurora A and B have very distinctive localisations and functions: Aurora A associates with the spindle poles to regulate entry into mitosis, centrosome maturation and spindle assembly; Aurora B is a member of the Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) that transfers from the inner centromere in early mitosis to the spindle midzone, equatorial cortex and midbody in late mitosis and cytokinesis. Aurora B functions include regulation of chromosome-microtubule interactions, cohesion, spindle stability and cytokinesis. This review will focus on how interacting proteins make this functional diversity possible by targeting the kinases to different subcellular locations and regulating their activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)796-805
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent opinion in cell biology
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2009

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