Mammalian peptidoglycan recognition protein TagL inhibits Listeria monocytogenes invasion into epithelial cells

Alexey Kibardin, Tatyana Karpova, Tatyana Sapenko, Jose Vazquez-Boland, Sergey Kiselev, Svetlana Ermolaeva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Peptidoglycan recognition proteins are a family of evolutionary conserved proteins that play a basic role in the innate immunity of insects, but their role in the immunity of mammals remains unclear. To elucidate its functions, a mouse member of the peptidoglycan recognition proteins family, TagL, was stably expressed in colon adenocarcinoma HT29 cells, and its effect on the invasion and intracellular growth of the enteroinvasive pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes was assessed. The expression of TagL substantially impaired bacterial invasion and early intracellular growth. The observed effects were partly caused by a loss of viability by intraphagosomal bacteria. Efficient phagosome escaping but not efficient invasion helped bacteria to overplay TagL.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-90
Number of pages7
JournalFEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Carrier Proteins/genetics
  • Carrier Proteins/physiology
  • HT29 Cells
  • Humans
  • Listeria monocytogenes/growth & development
  • Listeria monocytogenes/pathogenicity
  • Mice
  • Phagosomes/microbiology
  • Transfection

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