Managerialism and equalities: Tensions within widening access policy and practice for disabled students in UK universities

Sheila Riddell*, Elisabet Weedon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract / Description of output

New Labour’s public policy agenda, in education as elsewhere, has been driven by the twin goals of widening access and raising attainment through the implementation of new managerialist policies and practices. New public management has its origins in a neo-liberal philosophy which holds that all human behaviour can and should be measured and – in order to achieve efficiency, effectiveness and value for money in the public sector – all activity should be measured against agreed targets (Deakin, 1994; Clarke and Newman, 1997). The higher education sector exemplifies this approach, where targets have been set by Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) in relation to, for example, student retention and completion rates which feature in league tables.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationImproving Disabled Students' Learning
Subtitle of host publicationExperiences and Outcomes
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages19-37
Number of pages19
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781136033902
ISBN (Print)9780203609651
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 May 2013

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