Material methods: Considering ceramic raw materials and the spread of the potter's wheel in Early Iron Age southern Iberia

Beatrijs De Groot*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper discusses the role of clay selection and preparation in the production of wheel-made pottery in Early Iron Age southern Iberia. The first systematic use of potter’s wheels in the production of Early Iron Age ceramics in southern Iberia corresponds to the establishment of pottery workshops associated with Phoenician trade colonies, dating to the period between the end of the 10th and 7th century BCE. There are still many gaps in our understanding of how technological knowledge was transmitted between the Phoenician workshops and ‘indigenous’ communities that adopted the potter’s wheel. This paper draws upon a growing body of archaeometric and ceramic technological research to consider clay selection strategies in these new workshops. Secondly, this paper will consider the role of ceramic raw materials in the development of new ‘hybrid’ ceramic forms, particularly grey-ware. It will hereby provide theoretical considerations surrounding the significance of material cultural hybridity in answering questions raised by postcolonial archaeologists about identity, cultural transmission and hybridisation in the context of the Phoenician colonial system.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331 - 342
Number of pages12
JournalInterdisciplinaria Archaeologica - Natural Sciences in Archaeology
Volume12
Issue number2
Early online date2 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Iberian Peninsula
  • Iron Age
  • ceramic raw materials
  • Phoenicians
  • potter's wheel
  • technology
  • hybridity

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