Menorrhagia I: measured blood loss, clinical features, and outcome in women with heavy periods: a survey with follow-up data

Pamela E Warner, Hilary O D Critchley, Mary Ann Lumsden, Mary Campbell-Brown, Anne Douglas, Gordon D Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Menorrhagia is defined as blood loss of >80 mL, but in routine clinical practice measurement is seldom undertaken. Our aim was to identify the features of the clinical history that best predict menorrhagic blood loss.

STUDY DESIGN: A questionnaire survey of 952 menstrual complaint referrals at 3 hospital gynecology clinics in Glasgow and Edinburgh included 226 women with putatively heavy periods who also had consented to the measurement of their blood loss.

RESULTS: Only 34% (95% CI, 28%-40%) of women had blood loss volume of >80 mL, but the volume was associated with subjective heaviness of period. Logistic regression with ferritin status, clots, and changing rate during full flow correctly predicts a loss of >80 mL for 76% of women (n=161 patients; sensitivity, 60%; specificity, 86%). Diagnosis and treatment of patients seem unrelated to the volume of blood loss.

CONCLUSION: The subjective judgment of the volume of blood loss is better than has been believed. Clinical features can be combined to predict losses of >80 mL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1216-23
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume190
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2004

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Blood Volume
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Hypovolemia
  • Logistic Models
  • Menorrhagia
  • Menstrual Hygiene Products
  • Menstruation
  • Middle Aged
  • Pain Measurement
  • Predictive Value of Tests
  • Prevalence
  • Probability
  • Questionnaires
  • Risk Assessment
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Sickness Impact Profile

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