Mentalising skills in generic mental healthcare settings: can we make our day-to-day interactions more therapeutic?

HJ Welstead, J Patrick, TC Russ, G Cooney, CM Mulvenna, C Maclean, A Polnay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Aims and method

Caring for patients with personality disorder is one of the biggest challenges in psychiatric work. We investigated whether mentalisation-based treatment skills (MBT-S) teaching improves clinicians' understanding of mentalising and attitudes towards personality disorder. Self-report questionnaires (Knowledge and Application of MBT (KAMQ) and Attitudes to Personality Disorder (APDQ)) were completed at baseline and after a 2-day MBT-S workshop.

Results

Ninety-two healthcare professionals completed questionnaires before and after training. The mean within-participant increase in scores from baseline to end-of-programme was 11.6 points (95% CI 10.0–13.3) for the KAMQ and 4.0 points (1.8–6.2) for the APDQ.

Clinical implications

MBT-S is a short intervention that is effective in improving clinicians' knowledge of personality disorder and mentalisation. That attitudes to personality disorder improved overall is encouraging in relation to the possibility of deeper learning in staff and, ultimately, improved care for patients with personality disorder.

Declaration of interest

None.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-108
JournalBJPsych Bulletin
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2018

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