Microbubble oscillations in capillary tubes

David H. Thomas*, Vassilis Sboros, Marcia Emmer, Hendrik Vos, Nico de Jong

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In diagnostic medicine, microbubbles are used as contrast agents to image blood flow and perfusion in large and small vessels. The small vessels (the capillaries) have diameters from a few hundred micrometers down to less than 10 mu m. The effect of such microvessels surrounding the oscillating microbubbles is currently unknown, and is important for increased sensitivity in contrast diagnostics and manipulation of microbubbles for localized drug release. Here, oscillations of microbubbles in tubes with inner diameters of 25 mu m and 160 mu m are investigated using an ultra-high-speed camera at frame rates of similar to 12 million frames/s. A reduction of up to 50% in the amplitude of oscillation was observed for microbubbles in the smaller 25-mu m tube, compared with those in a 160-mu m tube. In the 25-mu m tube, at 50 kPa, a 48% increase of microbubbles that did not oscillate above the noise level of the system was observed, indicating increased oscillation damping. No difference was observed between the resonance frequency curves calculated for microbubbles in 25-mu m and 160-mu m tubes. Although previous investigators have shown the effect of microvessels on microbubble oscillation at high ultrasound pressures, the present study provides the first optical images of low-amplitude microbubble oscillations in small tubes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-114
Number of pages10
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Keywords

  • MICROVESSELS
  • NATURAL FREQUENCY
  • ACOUSTIC RESPONSE
  • ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS
  • BUBBLES
  • VESSELS

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