Mindfulness practice with a brain‐sensing device improved cognitive functioning of elementary school children: An exploratory pilot study

Boglarka Vekety, Alexander Logemann, Zsofia K. Takacs*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This is the first pilot study with children that has assessed the effects of a brain–computer interface‐assisted mindfulness program on neural mechanisms and associated cognitive perfor-mance. The participants were 31 children aged 9–10 years who were randomly assigned to either an eight‐session mindfulness training with EEG‐feedback or a passive control group. Mindfulness‐re-lated brain activity was measured during the training, while cognitive tests and resting‐state brain activity were measured pre‐ and post‐test. The within‐group measurement of calm/focused brain states and mind‐wandering revealed a significant linear change. Significant positive changes were detected in children’s inhibition, information processing, and resting‐state brain activity (alpha, theta) compared to the control group. Elevated baseline alpha activity was associated with less re-activity in reaction time on a cognitive test. Our exploratory findings show some preliminary sup-port for a potential executive function‐enhancing effect of mindfulness supplemented with EEG-feedback, which may have some important implications for children’s self‐regulated learning and academic achievement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • brain‐sensing device
  • brain–com-puter interface (BCI)
  • children
  • EEG‐feedback
  • executive functions
  • mindfulness training
  • neurofeedback
  • technology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mindfulness practice with a brain‐sensing device improved cognitive functioning of elementary school children: An exploratory pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this