Modelling residential habitability and human displacement for tsunami scenarios in Christchurch, New Zealand

Finn Scheele (Lead Author), Thomas Wilson, Emily Lane, Kate Crowley, Matthew Hughes, Tim Davies, James Williams, Lina Le, Uma S.R, Biljana Lukovic, Marion Schoenfeld, James Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Understanding the potential impacts of a large tsunami on a coastal region enables better planning of disaster management strategies. Potential housing damage, habitability, human displacement and sheltering needs are key concerns for emergency managers following tsunami events. This article presents a novel approach to address these requirements. We first review available literature on factors influencing residential habitability, human displacement and sheltering needs following disasters. Existing models are reviewed to identify lessons, gaps and opportunities that can inform the development of a new model. We then present a new model for estimating habitability, displacement and sheltering needs for tsunami (HDS-T). The model uses an additive scoring system incorporating both physical and demographic factors, weighted according to their relative influence. We demonstrate application of HDS-T through the case study of three tsunami scenarios affecting the coastal city of Christchurch, New Zealand. The results are time-varying, reflecting the response and early recovery phase of the tsunami events. For the largest scenario, 14,695 residents are displaced on the first day, with 1795 displaced residents requiring sheltering assistance. The number of displaced residents reduces to 9014 on Day 4, 7131 on Day 7, and 4366 at the time point of one month. HDS-T is designed to be adaptable to other natural hazards and contexts, such as earthquakes.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
Volume43
Issue number101403
Early online date21 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Sheltering
  • liveability
  • natural hazard
  • impact
  • risk
  • disaster

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