Modulation of the Interaction of Enteric Bacteria with Intestinal Mucosa by Stress-Related Catecholamines

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Stress associated with parturition, transport or mixing has long been correlated with enhanced faecal excretion of diarrhoeal zoonotic pathogens in animals such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. It may also predispose humans to infection and/or be associated with more severe outcomes. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens to sense and respond to host stress-related catecholamines. This article reviews evidence of the ability of catecholamine hormones to modulate interactions between Gram-negative diarrhoeal pathogens and intestinal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms that may be at work.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMicrobial Endocrinology
Subtitle of host publicationInterkingdom Signaling in Infectious Disease and Health
EditorsMark Lyte
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages143-166
Number of pages24
Volume874
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-20215-0
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-20214-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2015

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
ISSN (Print)0065-2598

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