Money from above: Cash transfers, moral desert and enfranchisement among Guaraní households of the Argentine Chaco

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract / Description of output

Historically, Argentina’s indigenous populations have been marginalized from state projects of belonging. However, the advent of cash transfer programs has allowed them to benefit from one of the state’s most recent attempts to enfranchise the poor. Drawing on ethnographic research, this chapter shows that, although conditional cash transfer money has created unprecedented material opportunities for indigenous Guaraní households, the ways in which this money is collected, circulated and spent raises problematic issues concerning moral desert that become entangled with gendered notions and practices at the local level. While scholarship on distributive welfare has emphasized relationships between states and citizens, this chapter argues that cash transfers also have moral implications that impinge upon the development of local social relations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMoney from the Government in Latin America
Subtitle of host publicationConditional Cash Transfer Programs and Rural Lives
EditorsMaria Elisa Balen, Martin Fotta
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter6
Pages114-129
Number of pages16
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781351173162
ISBN (Print)9780815387374
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2018

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