New Developments in Brief Interventions to Treat Problem Drinking in Nonspecialty Health Care Settings

Graeme B. Wilson*, Nick Heather, Eileen F. S. Kaner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The delivery of brief interventions (BIs) in health care settings to reduce problematic alcohol consumption is a key preventive strategy for public health. However, evidence of effectiveness beyond primary care is inconsistent. Patient populations and intervention components are heterogeneous. Also, evidence for successful implementation strategies is limited. In this article, recent literature is reviewed covering BI effectiveness for patient populations and subgroups, and design and implementation of BIs. Support is evident for short-term effectiveness in hospital settings, but long-term effects may be confounded by changes in control groups. Limited evidence suggests effectiveness with young patients not admitted as a consequence of alcohol, dependent patients, and binge drinkers. Influential BI components include high-quality change plans and provider characteristics. Health professionals endorse BI and feel confident in delivering it, but training and support initiatives continue to show no significant effects on uptake, prompting calls for systematic approaches to implementing BI in health care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-429
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent psychiatry reports
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • Alcohol
  • Problem drinking
  • Health care
  • Effectiveness
  • Implementation
  • Review
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • EMERGENCY-DEPARTMENT PATIENTS
  • BRIEF ALCOHOL INTERVENTIONS
  • INTERACTIVE VOICE RESPONSE
  • GENERAL-PRACTITIONERS
  • HEAVY DRINKING
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • CONSUMPTION
  • BARRIERS
  • EFFICACY

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