New light for old eyes: comparing melanopsin-mediated non-visual benefits of blue-light and UV-blocking intraocular lenses

Conrad Schmoll, Ashraf Khan, Peter Aspinall, Colin Goudie, Peter Koay, Christelle Tendo, James Cameron, Jenny Roe, Ian Deary, Baljean Dhillon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells form a blue-light-sensitive non-visual system mediating diverse physiological effects including circadian entrainment and cognitive alertness. Reduced blue wavelength retinal illumination through cataract formation is thought to blunt these responses while cataract surgery and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation have been shown to have beneficial effects on sleep and cognition. We aimed to use the reaction time (RT) task and the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) as a validated objective platform to compare non-visual benefits of UV- and blue-blocking IOLs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-128
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Aged
  • Cataract
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Cognition
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Lens Implantation, Intraocular
  • Lenses, Intraocular
  • Light
  • Male
  • Phacoemulsification
  • Prospective Studies
  • Questionnaires
  • Reaction Time
  • Regression Analysis
  • Rod Opsins
  • Sleep

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