New material of Chirostenotes pergracilis (Theropoda, Oviraptorosauria) from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada

G. F. Funston, P. J. Currie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The taxonomy of caenagnathids from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada, has remained problematic because of incomplete, partial skeletons that do not overlap anatomically. This is particularly problematic for referring mandibular remains, which are the most abundant caenagnathid fossils recovered, but cannot be confidently tied to taxa known from postcranial remains. A new, partial skeleton of Chirostenotes pergracilis preserves the mandibles, cervical and caudal vertebrae, and parts of the hindlimb. Importantly, this is the first specimen with associated mandibles and postcrania of a caenagnathid from the Dinosaur Park Formation, allowing for unambiguous referral of mandibles to this taxon. The mandibles are remarkably similar to those previously suggested to pertain to Chirostenotes pergracilis, and support its distinction from Caenagnathus collinsi. An unfused distal tarsal IV distinguishes the skeleton from Leptorhynchos elegans and supports the referral of small, upturned mandibles to this taxon. Osteohistological analysis indicates that the individual was approaching maximum body size, and provides information on the growth patterns and size of Chirostenotes pergracilis. Accordingly, this supports the division of Dinosaur Park Formation caenagnathids into three taxa of varying body sizes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
JournalHistorical Biology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Feb 2020

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