Observational study of small animal practitioners’ awareness, clinical practice and experience with faecal microbiota transplantation in dogs

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Abstract

To assess small animal practitioner’s awareness of the relatively novel procedure of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in dogs and their practices, indications, experience and assessment of outcome of this in canine patients. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed to practitioners in the UK and around the world, assessing demographics of respondents, their selection criteria for donors, their operating procedures and indications when performing FMT in dogs, as well as the observed outcomes. Analysis of results was descriptive. Data based on 155 responses from 13 different countries, 40% from primary care practices and 60% from referral hospitals, were analysed. The majority of respondents (71%) had never performed FMT. For the remaining, main indications were chronic enteropathy (64%) and parvovirus infection (21%), followed by other types of acute diarrhoea (15%). The most common mode of administration was via enema (79%) or endoscopically (55%), using fresh (76%) or frozen (46%) preparations mixed with saline/ water, while the amount administered was extremely variable. Median storage time of FMT was 90 days (range 1-180 days). 67% of participants routinely administer FMT more than once. Clinical response was mixed to good, with rare adverse events (n=4). 25 respondents (21.7%) wanted to start using FMT, while 45 (29%) wanted to continue or increase FMT administration for various gastrointestinal conditions. In conclusion, administration of FMT to dogs is currently rare amongst small animal practitioners, but generally follow current recommendations. Urgent consensus regarding donor selection and FMT application procedures for dogs is required.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100630
JournalTopics in Companion Animal Medicine
Volume47
Early online date9 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Jan 2022

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