On standard and optimal designs of industrial-scale 2-D seismic surveys

T. Guest, A. Curtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The principal aim of performing a survey or experiment is to maximize the desired information within a data set by minimizing the post-survey uncertainty on the ranges of the model parameter values. Using Bayesian, non-linear, statistical experimental design (SED) methods we show how industrial scale amplitude variations with offset (AVO) surveys can be constructed to maximize the information content contained in AVO crossplots, the principal source of petrophysical information from seismic surveys. The design method allows offset dependent errors, previously not allowed in non-linear geoscientific SED methods. The method is applied to a single common-midpoint gather. The results show that the optimal design is highly dependent on the ranges of the model parameter values when a low number of receivers is being used, but that a single optimal design exists for the complete range of parameters once the number of receivers is increased above a threshold value. However, when acquisition and processing costs are considered we find that a design with constant spatial receiver separation survey becomes close to optimal. This explains why regularly-spaced, 2-D seismic surveys have performed so well historically, not only from the point of view of noise attenuation and imaging in which homogeneous data coverage confers distinct advantages, but also to provide data to constrain subsurface petrophysical information.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)825-836
Number of pages12
JournalGeophysical Journal International
Volume186
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Inverse theory
  • Probability distributions
  • Statistical seismology
  • ALGORITHM
  • IMPEDANCE
  • NETWORK
  • INFORMATION
  • TOMOGRAPHY
  • STRATEGIES
  • AMPLITUDE
  • SELECTION
  • VELOCITY
  • POROSITY

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