Paramedic perceptions and attitudes to working with patients with alcohol related injury or illness

Mark Glencorse, Graeme Wilson, Dorothy Newbury-Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Aims: To ascertain views, perceptions and attitudes of paramedics when working
with patients presenting with alcohol-related injury or illness and to explore
perceived barriers and facilitators for the introduction of alcohol interventions to
the NHS ambulance services.

Methods: A total of 142 (24%) from 589 paramedics from the North East
Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust returned completed surveys between
January to April 2013, which included measures of current perceptions and
attitudes of working with patients with alcohol-related injury or illness, and the
Shortened Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ).

Results: Paramedics reported little to no formal training on working with
patients with alcohol-related injury or illness (77%). Paramedics scored
low across all domains of the SAAPPQ for working with both problem and
dependent drinkers. Not having suitable counseling materials (77%), not enough
training (72%) and no facilities or time to deal with prevention (69%) were key
barriers.

Conclusions: At this present time, levels of commitment, motivation, satisfaction, legitimacy and adequacy are low in front-line paramedics when working with patients with alcohol-related injury and illness. However, they are open to finding ways to provide interventions if they are adequately trained and have appropriate referral pathways open to them.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)310-318
JournalJournal of Paramedic Practice
Volume6
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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