Paths for All Workplace Step Count Challenge 2014: Changes in physical activity, walking behaviour and motivation for walking, and participant feedback

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

1) This report provides the first comprehensive assessment of self-reported changes in physical activity following the Step Count Challenge.
2) Self-report data on physical activity and motivation were collected at baseline (12 day window before start of challenge) and at 1 week after the end of the challenge (12 day window).
3) Participants reported being relatively physically active at baseline.
4) Overall, the Step Count Challenge led to small increases in weekly self-reported walking.
5) The Step Count Challenge led to small increases in weekly walking for transport and walking for leisure.
6) Although statistically small, these changes in self-reported walking equate to more than the recommended physical activity guideline of 150 minutes per week.
7) The Step Count Challenge did not lead to changes in walking at work.
8) The Step Count Challenge did not lead to changes in other forms of physical activity including cycling, housework, and moderate and vigorous leisure time activity.
9) The Step Count Challenge also led to a medium level decrease in sitting behaviour.
10) By participating in the Step Count Challenge people felt more competent about walking for health.
11) By participating the Step Count Challenge people became more autonomously motivated
for walking for health.
12) Over 80% of participants said they would do the Step Count Challenge again.
13) 93% of respondents felt that they had benefitted from the Step Count Challenge.
14) The benefits most frequently reported included enjoyment, building team morale and physical benefits.
15) Future research is required to expand on these findings using a randomised controlled design and objective measures of physical activity.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherPaths for All
Number of pages30
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2015

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