Perception of e-mail personality at zero-acquaintance: Extraversion takes care of itself; Neuroticism is a worry

Alastair J. Gill, Jon Oberlander

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract / Description of output

We investigate the impact of computer-mediated interaction on person perception. In particular, we study how traits important for socialisation and collaboration—Extraversion and Neuroticism—can be detected from the text of an e-mail communication. We have previously shown how Extraversion influences people’s language production in electronic
communication, in broadly intuitive ways. Here, we briefly outline the ways in which Neuroticism is expressed more through the high-level properties of a text. By their nature, these properties are less accessible to intuition. In subjective ratings of the texts for personality, we demonstrate that author Extraversion can be accurately perceived, given the limited cues, and that judges also exhibit relatively high agreement with each other for this trait. Neuroticism, however, appears more difficult. This result is consistent with previous findings, but suggests that e-mail exacerbates this discrepancy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 25th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 2003
Subtitle of host publicationCogSci 2003
EditorsRichard Alterman, David Kirsch
PublisherCognitive Science Society
Pages456-461
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Event25th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 31 Jul 20032 Aug 2003

Conference

Conference25th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period31/07/032/08/03

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