Phase II randomized study of neoadjuvant everolimus plus letrozole compared with placebo plus letrozole in patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

José Baselga, Vladimir Semiglazov, Peter van Dam, Alexey Manikhas, Meritxell Bellet, José Mayordomo, Mario Campone, Ernst Kubista, Richard Greil, Giulia Bianchi, Jutta Steinseifer, Betty Molloy, Erika Tokaji, Humphrey Gardner, Penny Phillips, Michael Stumm, Heidi A Lane, J Michael Dixon, Walter Jonat, Hope S Rugo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cross-talk between the estrogen receptor (ER) and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways is a mechanism of resistance to endocrine therapy, and blockade of both pathways enhances antitumor activity in preclinical models. This study explored whether sensitivity to letrozole was enhanced with the oral mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2630-7
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume27
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Antibiotics, Antineoplastic
  • Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
  • Aromatase Inhibitors
  • Biopsy
  • Breast Neoplasms
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
  • Cyclin D1
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Europe
  • Female
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
  • Humans
  • Ki-67 Antigen
  • Middle Aged
  • Mutation
  • Neoadjuvant Therapy
  • Nitriles
  • Palpation
  • Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
  • Phosphorylation
  • Postmenopause
  • Receptors, Estrogen
  • Receptors, Progesterone
  • Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases
  • Sirolimus
  • Time Factors
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Triazoles
  • Tumor Markers, Biological
  • United States

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