Physiological deterioration in the Emergency Department: the SNAP40-ED study

Matthew J Reed, Rachel O'brien, Polly Black, Steff C Lewis, Hannah Ensor, Matt Wilkes, Christopher Mccann, Stewart Whiting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Continuous novel ambulatory monitoring may detect deterioration in Emergency Department (ED) patients more rapidly, prompting treatment and preventing adverse events. Single-centre, open-label, prospective, observational cohort study recruiting high/medium acuity (Manchester triage category 2 and 3) participants, aged over 16 years, presenting to ED. Participants were fitted with a novel wearable monitoring device alongside standard clinical care (wired monitoring and/or manual clinical staff vital sign recording) and observed for up to 4 hours in the ED. Primary outcome was time to detection of deterioration. Two-hundred and fifty (250) patients were enrolled. In 82 patients (32.8%) with standard monitoring (wired monitoring and/or manual clinical staff vital sign recording), deterioration in at least one vital sign was noted during their four-hour ED stay. Overall, the novel device detected deterioration a median of 34 minutes earlier than wired monitoring (Q1, Q3 67,194; n=73, mean difference 39.48, p<0.0001). The novel device detected deterioration a median of 24 minutes (Q1, Q3 2,43; n=42) earlier than wired monitoring and 65 minutes (Q1, Q3 28,114; n=31) earlier than manual vital signs. Deterioration in physiology was common in ED patients. ED staff spent a significant amount of time performing observations and responding to alarms, with many not escalated. The novel device detected deterioration significantly earlier than standard care.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEmergency Care Journal
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Sep 2021

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