Plasmodium knowlesi transmission: integrating quantitative approaches from epidemiology and ecology to understand malaria as a zoonosis

Paddy M Brock, Kimberly M. Fornace, M. Parmiter, J. Cox, C. J. Drakeley, H. M. Ferguson, R. R. Kao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The public health threat posed by zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi appears to be growing: it is increasingly reported across South East Asia, and is the leading cause of malaria in Malaysian Borneo. Plasmodium knowlesi threatens progress towards malaria elimination as aspects of its transmission, such as spillover from wildlife reservoirs and reliance on outdoor-biting vectors, may limit the effectiveness of conventional methods of malaria control. The development of new quantitative approaches that address the ecological complexity of P. knowlesi, particularly through a focus on its primary reservoir hosts, will be required to control it. Here, we review what is known about P. knowlesi transmission, identify key knowledge gaps in the context of current approaches to transmission modelling, and discuss the integration of these approaches with clinical parasitology and geostatistical analysis. We highlight the need to incorporate the influences of fine-scale spatial variation, rapid changes to the landscape, and reservoir population and transmission dynamics. The proposed integrated approach would address the unique challenges posed by malaria as a zoonosis, aid the identification of transmission hot-spots, provide insight into the mechanistic links between incidence and land use change and support the design of appropriate interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-400
Number of pages12
JournalParasitology
Volume143
Issue number4
Early online date28 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

Keywords

  • malaria
  • mosquito
  • vector
  • zoonosis
  • Plasmodium knowlesi
  • macaque
  • infectious disease transmission
  • mathematical model
  • R-0
  • reproduction number
  • GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION
  • PUBLIC-HEALTH
  • VIVAX MALARIA
  • CHANGING EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • INCREASING INCIDENCE
  • POPULATION-DYNAMICS
  • DISTRIBUTION MODELS
  • INFECTIOUS-DISEASE
  • ANOPHELES-LATENS
  • ZOONOTIC MALARIA

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