Polymorphism of the Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) Gene Is Associated with Chimpanzee Neuroticism

Kyung-Won Hong, Alexander Weiss, Naruki Morimura, Toshifumi Udono, Ikuo Hayasaka, Tatyana Humle, Yuichi Murayama, Shin'ichi Ito, Miho Inoue-Murayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the brain, serotonin production is controlled by tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), a genotype. Previous studies found that mutations on the TPH2 locus in humans were associated with depression and studies of mice and studies of rhesus macaques have shown that the TPH2 locus was involved with aggressive behavior. We previously reported a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the form of an amino acid substitution, Q468R, in the chimpanzee TPH2 gene coding region. In the present study we tested whether this SNP was associated with neuroticism in captive and wild-born chimpanzees living in Japan and Guinea, respectively. Even after correcting for multiple tests (Bonferroni p = 0.05/6 = 0.008), Q468R was significantly related to higher neuroticism (b = 0.372, p = 0.005). This study is the first to identify a genotype linked to a personality trait in chimpanzees. In light of the prior studies on humans, mice, and rhesus macaques, these findings suggest that the relationship between neuroticism and TPH2 has deep phylogenetic roots.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere22144
Pages (from-to)-
Number of pages5
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2011

Keywords

  • SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER GENE
  • MAJOR DEPRESSION
  • PAN-TROGLODYTES
  • REGULATORY REGION
  • PROMOTER POLYMORPHISM
  • PERSONALITY STRUCTURE
  • HAPLOTYPE ANALYSIS
  • ZOOLOGICAL PARKS
  • NO ASSOCIATION
  • HARM AVOIDANCE

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